Frame 107, Page 188 - Compound subjects


In frame 106, Question 2's answer is 2 because the head nouns are "you" and "I." Can I say that "you and I" are head nouns? The reason why I ask is because Frame 107 a's answer says that "People
and their managers" are the compound subjects.
In my opinion, those two explanations are contradictory.

ANSWER:

I think you are confusing the terms "head noun" and "compound subject."

"You and I" and "People and their managers" are both compound subjects. They each contain two head nouns.

"You and I" cannot be called a head noun. "You and I" is a compound subject that contains two head nouns, "you" and "I."

Similarly, "people and their managers" is one subject, a compound subject, that contains two head nouns, "people" and "managers."

If you require further explanation, use the link below that says "Click here to post comments" and write me a question in the comments.

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Professor iEnglish

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Frame 118, Page 166 - Vertical Lines


I think the vertical lines are situated in wrong places in lines 3 to 7.

ANSWER:

YES, you're right! All of the vertical lines should be placed right before "was."

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Professor iEnglish

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Frame 137, Page 128 - Sentences starting with "because."


The question says c is incorrect. I usually used this expression when I learned English, but is this wrong in academic writing?

ANSWER:

YES, it is incorrect to write the following in academic English:

Man finds it hard to get what he wants. Because he does not want the best.

The sentence starting with the subordinating conjunction "because" is not a complete sentence but a sentence fragment, because subordinating conjunctions begin dependent clauses (see frame 19). A sentence must contain at least one independent clause for it to be a complete sentence. It cannot contain just one dependent clause.

In academic writing, we do not write incomplete sentences except in very special circumstances, for example for literary purposes.

However, keep in mind the fact that rules for writing do not always apply when speaking. When you say you "used the expression," do you mean that you used the expression in writing or speaking?

If speaking, there would be nothing wrong with speaking in sentence fragments. It happens naturally all the time among native speakers.

In certain types of informal writing, too, it may also be okay to use sentence fragments like they were complete sentences.

When writing academically, however, it is usually never a good idea to write sentence fragments or incomplete sentences...unless you are a professional writer who knows how to break the rules 'correctly'.

I hope this helps.

Work hard and be successful,

Professor iEnglish

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