Frame 13, Page 25 - Why is "who" the subject?

In this sentence, why is "who" the subject? I thought Kirkpatrick Macmillan is the subject.

The pedals were added in 1840 by a Scottish blacksmith, Kirkpatrick Macmillan, who is credited with inventing the real bicycle.

ANSWER:

I'm going to answer this question in a somewhat indirect way.

"Who" is a pronoun and can function as a subject. The fact that it is there in the sentence means that it has some kind of a function.

If "Kirkpatrick Macmillan" were the subject, then there must be no "who" between this subject and its verb, "is."

Can you see, now, why "who" is the subject of the verb "is" and why "Kirkpatrick Macmillan" cannot be the subject?

I hope so.

Work hard and be successful,

Professor iEnglish

Click here to post comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Learn English Grammar: iEnglish® 204 QA.

Frame 14, Page 27 - Why is (c) the SVC pattern?

Johann Vaaler was born on 15 March 1866 in Auskog, Norway.

The answer says that this is the SVC pattern, but I think it is the passive pattern.

ANSWER:

Good! This is a great question, and I'm so glad that you asked it!

The word "born" is very often misunderstood to be a verb. It is, in fact, an adjective.

There is a verb that sounds like it: the past participle of bear, i.e. borne.

"Born" and "borne" are not the same! Consider these examples:

She has borne two children.

The children were born three years apart.

Can you see the difference in meaning between "born" and "borne"? If not, please look up "born" and "bear" in a good English-English dictionary.

"Born" is always an adjective. That is why it is used in SVC clauses, never in passive clauses.

I hope this helps to answer your question.

Work hard and be successful,

Professor iEnglish

Click here to post comments

Join in and write your own page! It's easy to do. How? Simply click here to return to Learn English Grammar: iEnglish® 204 QA.

Study, Succeed and Shine!