Frame 80, Page 159 - Subject of 'Look'

What is the subject of 'Look' in the last sentence?

ANSWER:

Good question!

This last sentence is a 'command' sentence, or what we call an "imperative" sentence. In sentences like this, the subject is assumed to be "you," as in, "You do this."

I hope this helps.

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Professor iEnglish

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Frame 85, Page 169 - "not" in the verb phrase


The answer for frame 84 says, "The negative particle or adverb is not considered to be a part of the verb phrase, however." However, frame 85's answer includes "not." Isn't it a contradiction?

ANSWER:

YES, you're right! The answer for frame 85 should not contain the word "not" in the verb phrase. It should be:

does...need

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Professor iEnglish

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Frame 88, Page 175 - Isn't the last "work" also a verb phrase?


At the end of paragraph, it says "anything but work". Isn't this "work" also a verb phrase?

ANSWER:

Good question!

But the answer is No. Let me explain.

The compound predicate that we have in (5) includes the words would ('d) rather, and these words apply across all of the verb phrases in the predicate. For example, we may rewrite the entire sentence in this way:

I would rather read, would rather tell..., would rather crack..., would rather talk...would rather laugh--

Now, when we do the same with "anything but work," we notice that there's actually a main verb missing: do.

would rather do anything but work.

The main verb in "anything but work" is do. It is missing because the writer has chosen to drop it. We drop word like this that are necessary to complete the sentence structure when it does not affect the meaning. We do it especially frequently in spoken English.

The technical term for dropping words in sentence construction is "ellipsis." Another example of "ellipsis" is also found in (5). When "would rather" was dropped from all but the first verb phrase, the writer has used ellipsis.

I hope this helps!

Work hard and be successful,

Professor iEnglish

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Frames 96 to 98 - Auxiliary verbs be, have and do

I can't understand why c & d are correct in frame 96. Could you explain it concretely?

ANSWER:

Very good! You have caught an error in the answer. The answer for frame 96 should be the same as the answer for frame 97. The auxiliary verbs "be" and "have" do not change forms depending on the modal verb that precedes it, because verbs always occur in their base forms when they follow a modal verb.

The answer for frame 98, though, is different from that of frames 96 and 97, because the verb "do" is never used as an auxiliary verb after a modal verb. The verb "do" occurs only as a main verb when it follows a modal verb.

I hope this helps.

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Professor iEnglish

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Frame 98, Page 195 - How does the auxiliary verb "do" vary depending on the tense?

Why is the answer c and d? I think "a" can also be the answer. I don't understand how the tense can vary the auxiliary verb "do." Can you please explain?

ANSWER:

Of course. Please consider these examples:

When do you usually get to school?

When did you get to school yesterday?


Do you see how the auxiliary verb changed its form depending on the verb tense?

If not, let me know via a comment and I will explain further. (See the link below, "Click here to post comments.")

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