Frame 59, Page 117 - Differences in American and British spelling


(1) Now my long curiosity is solved because of this book on Frame 59, thanks a lot. However, there is one thing I am not sure about. Frame 59 only shows us about 'past participle.' How about the present participle? As written in Frame 94, is only "travelling" right? Can the American spelling rule also apply in this situation? Please, solve my curiosity!

(2) Are there any other differences between American and British English spelling?

ANSWER:

Question (1)

Yes! The single/double-consonant difference exists for present participles, also.

Question (2)

Yes! I suggest you check out this Web page for more differences in American and British English spelling: http://oxforddictionaries.com/page/spellingbritamericanspell/british-and-american-spelling

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Frame 63, Page 125 - Drunk vs. Drunken


Can I write "drunken" for "drunk"?

ANSWER:

This is a good question, but the answer is NO. "Drunken" is an adjective. "Drunk" is a verb, the past participle form of the verb "drink." They have completely different functions.

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Frame 83, Page 165 - Answer for (the same as, different from)

There is no answer in the next frame for (the same as, different from) question in this frame. What is the answer for it?

ANSWER:

The answer is: the same as

Another frame that has similar information is frame 74, page 147.

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Frame 94, Page 187 - What does it mean that the present continuous tense is used to set the background of a story?


The book said that the past continuous tense can be used to set the background of a story. However I can't understand what this means. Can you give me some examples?

ANSWER:

When telling a story or reporting an event, actions are often expressed in the past simple tense. However, at the beginning of the story, when the action is just starting, the background of the story or how the story begins sometimes involves an action that was already happening at the time the 'real' action of the story begins. This longer action, expressed in the past continuous tense, helps to provide the background for the story or event, or introduce the story or event.

For example, in frame 94, The 'real' action begins in sentence #2, while the story begins with a description of a background situation in sentence #1.

In frame 95, the real action begins in sentence #1 at the word "when," while the first half of sentence #1 provides the background situation in which that story happens.

In frame 96, as well, the exciting action starts in the second clause of sentence #1, while the first clause of sentence #1 serves merely to introduce the background of the event.

I hope this helps. Let me know if you would like further explanation by using the link below that says "Click here to post comments."

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Professor iEnglish

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