Frame 69, Page 137 – Can a clause be used like an object?

It is easy to see the SVO pattern in a simple sentence. But in the complicated sentence like the one in Frame 69 that contains a clause beginning with 'that', I have a little problem finding the object. Can the clause be used like an object?

ANSWER:

Good question!

Yes, a clause can be used like an object. However, when it is, the sentence is no longer a simple sentence, but it becomes a complex sentence.

You will learn in iEnglish 205: The Complex Sentence that clauses can have a variety of functions. As single units or entities, clauses can function as nouns, adjectives or adverbs.

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Professor iEnglish

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Frame 97, Page 193 – Isn’t the S+V+O pattern a type or subset of the S+V+C pattern?

I think that S+V+O format is included in S+V+C, because the verb complement gives necessary explanation of the main verb. Therefore, objects can be considered a verb complement. Is this right?

ANSWER:

This is a good question, because you are really thinking about what you are learning!

I think the confusion has to do with the terms "verb complement" and "subject complement."

You are right in that the object is a type of verb complement.

The "C" in S+V+C, however, does not stand for verb complement. It stands for subject complement.

Subject complements are another type of verb complement. They provide information about the subject or complete the meaning of the subject. In other words, they have two roles: one is to complete the meaning of the verb, and in that sense, they are also verb complements; the other is to complete the meaning of the subject, and in that sense, they are subject complements.

In sum, there are TWO types of verb complement: (1) the object (2) and the subject complement. The "C" in SVC stands for the second type of verb complement, the subject complement.

Work hard and be successful,

Professor iEnglish

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